Colin wakes us up at 530...and then we look at sunrise on this side of our world!

we buried the ashes of our parents before the star rose over the sea and felt her warmth...

it was like their spirits were with me...
I felt so much energy taking the rip out after an exhausting sprint fueled by the adrenaline of anticipating this event for weeks ... watching Her energy each morning as I sip my coffee, waiting to take Her for a ride and which way the road will be... to go with the southern sweep and then chat with a favorite lifeguard friend or a new friend I haven't met yet...
and discuss the nuances of the ocean's spirit today...
we go for a few "world titles"
and then swim back finding another rip past the breakers...
and find the strong wave take me to my spot where I park on my chair each morning...
and have brekkie on my barbie
with my familie ;)

the following essay is from Stu, the philosopher lifeguard
 ( he is the rock of this great fraternity(sorority) of folks that just love the sea!! and theres nothing like this club in America!)


"Gold Coast City Titles 2011

The benefit of race planning.

At the recent Gold Coast City titles surf carnival at Meramid Beach we had 5 competitors swimming in the masters and open surf race.

The importance of race plan was a very good example in the over 50's surf race which had over 20 competitors from the age of 50 up to 70 years of age.

One of our athletes J in his first carnival performed exceptionally well against swimmers with more experience and fantastic historical records at surf race swimming from their open competition days till now as masters. J and I disscussed the benefits of visualising swimming the perfect race. Article on web site. He had to plan his race. As the carnival was at his home beach we had a good insight to currents, rips and sand banks from training and working the conditions all week. J lives on the beach at Mermaid and swims most days straight in front of his house where he uses a consistant rip to get out the back in all conditions. From half a metre to at least three metres or sometimes bigger. It has been an unexpected delimma for relieving casual lifeguards to see him venture out in some testing conditions as they do not recognise his bald head and are not aware of his ability or J has not informed them first. ( I guess I should find their number and give them a buzz first??)
 He does do this now on a regular basis.

Race Day.

J, S and G warmed up together for the swim by going around the course and standing on the dunes to pick the best ally out and back in. It was a credit to their instructions from us to plan their course.

where's that bald bloke going?? he's missing all the waves that are holding everybody else back!
J was too the extreme South for the start of the race. After the brief by the course judge he went back to the most Southern position of all competitors. This was a good tactic as the judges did not say anything about his position. On go he ran further South to the beginning of the J rip which was travelling out to sea on an outgoing tide. No one followed him out from over 20 other competitors. He did have the thought 'Am I doing the right thing here?' He ran fast and dived and waded at full speed, only also to think 'how long can I keep this speed up? Looking across to the field of swimmers to the North he was still level as they were swimming across the gutter to the shallow bank, before he began to swim in green water travelling out to sea at a rate of knots. J thought swim fast but in good form as he had worked hard in the run and wade. His rhythm was good and quickly passed under a couple of waves out behind the back break. 'Where is everyone? was his next thought and 'where are the bouys' as it was a very long swim to the bouys. He then put in process the rest of his plan which was to swim diagonally towards the North out to see, as he new the first turning bouy was in this direction from after his warm up. Everything going good so far, just keep the rhythm and rating out and along the bouys. After the last bouy turn and several meters back in, the first competitor came up beside him. A much faster swimmer than J but still only a human and if he did the right thing at the time, was to get on that persons feet which would improve his speed home. One more came up and past. He did not know if either were in his age group. Another caught him at the break where a consistant one and half metre wave was dumping on the bank. He had gone the right direction back in, away from the rip but did not look for a wave early enough. The third swimmer pulled a wave and so did J but he got dumped and travelled a short distance in compared to the other fellow on the wave who finished in front of J. This fellow was in J's age group. J came second in his age group and fourth overall. A fantastic achievement for a first time competitor."
great fraternity(sorority) of folks that just love the sea!!
Dear Reader,
Gold Coast City Titles 2011
The benefit of race planning.
At the recent Gold Coast City titles surf carnival at Meramid Beach we had 5 competitors swimming in the masters and open surf race.
The importance of race plan was a very good example in the over 50's surf race which had over 20 competitors from the age of 50 up to 70 years of age.
One of our athletes J in his first carnival performed exceptionally well against swimmers with more experience and fantastic historical records at surf race swimming from their open competition days till now as masters. John and I disscussed the benefits of visualising swimming the perfect race. Article on web site. He had to plan his race. As the carnival was at his home beach we had a good insight to currents, rips and sand banks from training and working the conditions all week. John lives on the beach at Mermaid and swims most days straight in front of his house where he uses a consistant rip to get out the back in all conditions. From half a metre to at least three metres or sometimes bigger. It has been an unexpected delimma for relieving casual lifeguards to see him venture out in some testing conditions as they do not recognise his bald head and are not aware of his ability or J has not informed them first. He does do this now on a regular basis.
Race Day.
J, S and G warmed up together for the swim by going around the course and standing on the dunes to pick the best ally out and back in. It was a credit to their instructions from us to plan their course.

J was too the extreme South for the start of the race. After the brief by the course judge he went back to the most Southern position of all competitors. This was a good tactic as the judges did not say anything about his position. On go he ran further South to the beginning of the J (namesake's) rip which was travelling out to sea on an outgoing tide. No one followed him out from over 20 other competitors. He did have the thought 'Am I doing the right thing here?' He ran fast and dived and waded at full speed, only also to think 'how long can I keep this speed up? Looking across to the field of swimmers to the North he was still level as they were swimming across the gutter to the shallow bank, before he began to swim in green water travelling out to sea at a rate of knots. J thought swim fast but in good form as he had worked hard in the run and wade. His rhythm was good and quickly passed under a couple of waves out behind the back break. 'Where is everyone? was his next thought and 'where are the bouys' as it was a very long swim to the bouys. He then put in process the rest of his plan which was to swim diagonally towards the North out to see, as he new the first turning bouy was in this direction from after his warm up. Everything going good so far, just keep the rhythm and rating out and along the bouys. After the last bouy turn and several meters back in, the first competitor came up beside him. A much faster swimmer than J but still only a human and if he did the right thing at the time, was to get on that persons feet which would improve his speed home. One more came up and past. He did not know if either were in his age group. Another caught him at the break where a consistant one and half metre wave was dumping on the bank. He had gone the right direction back in, away from the rip but did not look for a wave early enough. The third swimmer pulled a wave and so did J but he got dumped and travelled a short distance in compared to the other fellow on the wave who finished in front of J. This fellow was in J's age group.


J came second in his age group and fourth overall. A fantastic achievement for a first time competitor.

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